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Algonquin Canoeing and Kayaking

Paddle Sports

   

Canoeing

This is what the park is famous for. It has over 1600 canoe routes and a wealth of campsites. The routes range from single lake access to your choice of a never ending combination of lakes and rivers. To be practical, we have listed the main access points rather than the routes. Many of the parks routes require one or more portages so choose a route that you feel comfortable with before setting out.

Paddlers new to the sport may find that Canoe and Opeongo lakes are good launch points. The access points outside the main corridor (Hwy 60) are often the best ways to access the park interior. For more information consult the map section.

If you are looking to rent a canoe, kayak or hire a guide - have a look at our Outfitters and Guides section.

 
 

 

  • Arlen Lake - Southern Section (Starts Outside Park) North of Hwy 60 12km east of Madawaska.
  • Basin Lake - South Eastern Section (Starts Outside Park) Off of Hwy 17 east of Pembroke on Hwy 62 north of Round Lake.
  • Big Bissett Lake - North Eastern Section (Starts Outside Park) Off Hwy 17 north of Pembroke and south of Bissett Creek.
  • Brian Lake - North Western Section Hwy 60 east of North Bay just outside Mattawa.
  • Cache Lake - Southern Section (Main Corridor) Nearly in the middle of Hwy 60 running through the park.
  • Cedar Lake Brent - Northern Section Off of Hwy 17 in the north central edge of the park.
  • Canoe Lake - Southern Section(Main Corridor) Off Hwy 60 this is most popular put-in in the park.
  • Grande Lake - Eastern Section (Sand Lake Gate) Off Hwy 17 between Pembroke and Petawawa
  • Galeairy Lake - Southern Section (Starts Outside Park) Just outside Whitney before the parks west entrance on Hwy 60.
  • Hay Lake - Lower Southern Section (Starts Outside Park) Off Hwy 127 north of the town of Maynooth
  • Hollow River - South Eastern Section(Starts Outside Park) Between Dwight and Dorset off of Hwy 35
  • Kawawaymog Lake - Western Section (Starts Outside Park) Off Hwy 11 from South River.
  • Kingscote Lake - Lower Southern Section Off Hwy 127 before the junction of 62.
  • Kioshkokwi Lake - Northern Section On Hwy 630 off of Hwy 17.
  • Lake Opeongo - Southern Section (Main Corridor) On of the main put-ins in the park just north or Hwy 60
  • Lake Travers - Eastern Section (Sand Lake Gate) Off of Hwy 17 at the furthest reaches of the eastern park road.
  • McManus Lake - Eastern Section (Sand Lake Gate) Off Hwy 17 between Pembroke and Petawawa.
  • Magnetawan Lake - Western Section Hwy 518 north of Kearney access from Hwy 11.
  • Mallard Lake - Eastern Section (Sand Lake Gate) Just west of the eastern park entrance off of Hwy 17.
  • North River - Northern Section (Starts Outside Park) Off of Hwy 17 North of Deux Rivieres.
  • Pinetree Lake - Eastern Section (Sand Lake Gate) Off Hwy 17 north of the eastern park road near the entrance.
  • Rain Lake - Western Section Off Hwy 11 east or Kearney.
  • Rock Lake - Southern Section (Main Corridor) South of Hwy 60 west of the turn off for Opeongo.
  • Shall Lake - Southern Section North of Madawaska off of Hwy 60.
  • Smoke Lake - Southern Section (Main Corridor) South of Hwy 60 east of Canoe Lake.
  • Source Lake - Southern Section (Main Corridor) North of Hwy 60 east of canoe Lake
  • Tim River - Western Section Off route 11 north of Kearney at the edge of the park.
  • Wendigo Lake - Northern Section (Starts Outside Park) North of Deux Rivieres off of Hwy 17.

For a list of the topographical maps that cover the park and a link to Friends of Algonquin website where you can obtain a detailed map of the parks canoe routes have a look at our map section.

Algonquin Park Map - Wonderful online map created by Jeffrey McMurtrie under Creative Commons - make a contribution to show your appreciation for his work.

Algonquin Map

Canadian Canoe Routes - Canada's best canoe route site has over 60 detailed route descriptions for Algonquin

For information on outdoor guiding, instruction or canoe rentals for the park have a look at our Guides and Outfitters section.

Of Special Note: Algonquin Park has a complete ban on cans and bottles in the backcountry - and they enforce it. To try to prevent overbooking the entire park is now a controlled camping zone, where well thought out itineraries are essential. Contact the park staff for details.

 


   

Canoe Camping

World renown for canoeing, there are over 1800 wilderness sites in the park on more than 1600km of canoe routes. Most of the lakes have sites dotting their shorelines so there are a lot of options. To try to prevent over booking the entire park is now a controlled camping zone, where well thought out itineraries are essential. Contact the park staff for details.

 
 
For information on outdoor guiding, instruction or canoe rentals for the park have a look at our Guides and Outfitters section.


Kayaking

The park wouldn't be complete without at least a few white water areas. Of course much of this is more suitable to white water canoeists. Contact the park for information on the best sites in and around the park.

Madawaska

This is perhaps the most famous of Ontario's whitewater river and has a lot of variation with rapids ranging from class I to class V. The river flows for a distance of over 70km. The river starts just at the park border (Whitney) in the southern section and can be accessed on several points along Hwy 60.

The river is broken up by lakes into three distinct sections. The lower section through Palmer Rapids is a great area for learning and improving your skills. The upper part of the river is generally more difficult and demanding. Finally the short middle section has some really fun sections if you have the skills The river is dam controlled and the water levels may not reflect the season.

Opeongo

The rivers headwaters start just outside the southern section of the park in Victoria Lake and empties into the Madawaska 30km later. While the river isn't really long it does have its share of play areas and challenges which are sometimes overlooked due to its proximity to the Madawaska. This is a scenic area which also makes for very nice canoe tripping if you have whitewater skills. The river's rapids ranges from class I to IV.

The river can be accessed within the park by canoeing from Farm Lake to the headwaters at Shall Lake. Farm Lake is at the end of Victora-McCauley Lake Road off of Hwy 60 just west of the town of Madawaska. The river is at its best in the spring.

Petawawa

This is the only significant stretch of whitewater that lies within the park boundaries. The Petawawa's source is Daisy Lake on the west side of the park. From here to Brent on Cedar Lake, the river is ideal for flat water canoe tripping. It is slow & any rapids are too shallow to be run.

Cedar receives water from the Petawawa & Nipissing Rivers as well as many creeks. As a result, the Petawawa has much more water from this point on & the whitewater fun begins. The final access point is at McManus Lake on the east side of the park.

There are a number of possible put-ins with the main one being at Brent Lake. Brent Lake is reached from outside the park off of Hwy 17 from Deux Riviers. It should be noted that the section of the river passed the park border is a live firing range for the Canadian Army and should under no circumstances be run.

Sea Kayaking

There are a number of lakes in the park where sea kayaks would find themselves right at home including Canoe and Opeongo. Campsites along these shores can be accessed easily with a sea kayak but be aware that these campsites are taken early.

For information on outdoor guiding, instruction or kayak rentals, for the park have a look at our Guides and Outfitters section.

For current conditions, along with definitive information on the park, contact the park authorities. For regional information check with the local chambers of commerce and tourism offices. Outdoor shops, outfitters and clubs in the vicinity of the park may be other excellent sources of information.

Of Special Note: Algonquin Park has a complete ban on cans and bottles in the backcountry - and they enforce it. To try to prevent overbooking the entire park is now a controlled camping zone, where well thought out itineraries are essential. Contact the park staff for details.

For current conditions, along with definitive information on the park, contact the park authorities. For regional information check with the local chambers of commerce and tourism offices. Outdoor shops, outfitters and clubs in the vicinity of the park may be other excellent sources of information.

 

 
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