Vancouver

As the story goes, the greater Vancouver area has over 3500km of hiking trails. Just for the sake of arguement lets just say this is true. We're talking something bumping up against the Appalachian Trial contained within a postage stamp of an area. That's eight months straight, of ten to twelve hour days, pounding the trail. That's two pairs of really dead hiking boots. Whoa! We better get started!

Start with some easy trials close by in Stanley Park, then head over to Burnaby Mountain for lots and lots more. What about the Sea to Sky or that crazy Grouse Grind! The Grind will give you a great baseline if your a speed hiker. Now head up Hwy 99, stopping at the dozens of trails along the way and well... take a hike. Other options? Head east and visit Golden Ears, Manning, the Stien or Skagit Provincial Parks for dozens and dozens of more trails. Imagine! This is only the beginning, your're not even warmed up yet.

 
 

Anyone entering the British Columbia backcountry should be very experience in the outdoors with a good knowledge of wilderness first aid and good route finding skills. In addition, you should always leave a detailed itinerary with someone responsible you know or sign out a safety registration with the parks service before you depart. The best months for hiking and backpacking are in mid-May to mid-October but snow can often be found in the high country into July. Some trails in the Coast and Mountains region require scrambling (or rope assisted sections) or even snowfield/glacier travel along with its inherent risk. Avalanches are another danger which should be considered. Weather conditions in these mountains can change in an instant along with visibility.

 

Backpacking

Sunshine Coast Trail - The trail works its way down the Sunshine Coast across the Gwendoline Hills and Tin Hat Mountains from north of Lund at Sarah Point, passed Powell River to Saltery Bay. Rustic campsites are available along route. This is a an exceptional hike in a spectacular area and it's gaining a well deserved reputation. It's recommended to hike the trail from north to south. The trail head is just outside Powell River at Sarah Point which is only accessible by water. A water taxi will take you and your gear to the starting point for a fee. The southern section of the trail may have snow well into the hiking season so make a point of checking conditions before you book. Have a look at the trail's website for more information. From Vancouver take the Lion's Gate Bridge to West Vancouver and follow Tyler Way to the Upper Levels Highway and head towards Squamish. Exit at Horseshoe Bay to catch the ferry to Gibson's Landing on the Sunshine Coast. From Gibsons the 101 will take you up the coast to Earl's Cove where you catch a second ferry Saltry Bay. Continuing on the 101 north will take you to Powell River.

Sea to Sky Trail - This is a work in progress, and what a piece of work it is. Winding its way through some of the worlds most breathtaking scenery the trail is spectacular. With plans to go from south of Squamish, through Whistler, Pemberton and then on to D'Arcy it covers the best of the Sea to Sky area. The section from Squamish past Whistler is already open and the rest will be completed shortly. You can access this multiuse trail in several area for short hikes or you can attempt the whole 150kms. Note: Sections of the trail may see heavy mountain bike usage.

Garibaldi Provincial Park - There are 196 wilderness sites available, along with a number of huts. National Topographic Series Maps, Scale, 1:50,000, sheets 92J2, 3, 14, 15 and 16 cover the park

Black Tusk Area

From the Rubble Creek parking lot there are two trails which lead to designated campsites - the Garibaldi Lake trail and the Taylor Meadows Trial.

Taylor Meadows 7.5km, Intermediate The trial to Taylor Meadows begins 6km from the parking lot along the Garibaldi Lake Trail. To get to Taylor Lake, it will take you about 3 or 4 hours. The trail has an elevation change of just less than a 1000 meters.

The Garibaldi Lake Trail - 9km, Intermediate The trail is probably the most popular and the most beautiful. The trail moves through 800 meters of climbs and should take about 3 or 4 hours one way. From either campsite there are a number of other trails which can be hiked or joined together to extend your backpacking trip. There are pit toilets at the campsites. Regulations require the use of a cookstove in the camping area.

Diamond Head Area

Description: 22km return, Novice, Intermediate From the parking lot at the top of Mamqam Road, the trail climbs 600 meters over 11 km. The trail follows a ridge, allowing for some excellent overviews of the area. The Elfin Lake hut at the end of the trail will accommodate 34 people, there is a fee for over nighting. From Elfin lake you can take a day hike along the trail to the edge of Garibaldi Glacier. This is a great place to introduce a novice to backpacking since the hut lets you lighten the load a bit.

Sing Pass Area

There are two ways to reach the singing pass area from Whistler Mountain or from the parking along the access road from Whistler Village.

Musical Bumps - The acessed point is beside the Roundhouse Lodge at the top of the Village Gondola (you can forgo the gondola and hike up the 5000+ feet with all your equipment, if you really like to suffer). From here you reach the trail by following either the Harmony Meadows or Harmnony Lake trails. The trail continues up along Harmony Ridge, passed Symphony Bowl and Lake where it's intersected by Burnt Stew (which you can use on your return if you wish). The trail then follows along the boundary with spectacular Garibaldi before heading into the park and to Singing Pass. Russet Lake has campsites and a hut.

Singing Pass from the Access Road - 9.5km, intermediate/expert , 850m Follow the access road under the gondola at Whistler Village to the parking lot. From the parking lot the trail follows the Fitzsimmons and Melody Creeks to the pass where a series of switchbacks will take you to Russet Lake where you find campsites and a hut.

Out-There's Backpacking and Hiking
Out-There's British Columbia
British Columbia - Official Site


Huts

The hut system in Canada is extensive but not well know outside of climbing and ski mountaineering circles. There are huts throughout the Alberta and British Columbia mountain ranges. There are also less isolated systems of huts thoughout Quebec and Ontario. Many of the mountain huts are the work of the Alpine Club of Canada as well as other clubs such as the British Colunbia Mountaineering Club. Some are indepent, in the east many are run by the parks bodies. While facilities are usually minimal some huts are really quite appealing in their accomodations and many share one common traite; they are often located in some of Canada's finest backcountry. With few exceptions huts are not accessible by car and some have access which requires expert outdoor skills.

You must pack in your own gear with the exception of that provided. Some of the access routes require expert skills in either climbiing, scrambling, mountaineering and ski mountaineering. In the winter many appoaches are through avalanche areas. Some huts are only accessible in the summer or rarely used due to difficult acess in the winter.Consult with the various authorities regarding use, fees, gear and skills requirements before doing any planning.

  • Burton Hut - Garibaldi, Garibaldi Lake / Capacity: Sleeps 10 Features: Utensils
  • Diamond Head - Garibaldi, Elfin Lakes / Conditions: Fee Capacity: Sleeps 30 Features: Stove
  • Flavelle Hut - East of Garibaldi, North of Anniversary Glacier / Contact Squamish Rockclimbing Club, Capacity: Sleeps 15-20
  • Himmelsbach Hut - Garibaldi, Russet Lake / British Columbia Mountaineering Club / Capacity: Sleeps 12
  • Lizzie Creek Cabin - East of Garibaldi, Lizzie Lake / Capacity: Sleeps 8
  • Sentinel Glacier Huts- Garibaldi, Black Tusk Meadows / Contact: Department of the Environment, Glaciology Division, Capacity: Sleeps 4
  • Elfin Lake
  • Russet Lake
  • Wedgemont Lake

    Canadian Avalanche Association
    Avalanche Safety

Out-There's Backpacking and Hiking
Out-There's British Columbia
British Columbia - Official Site


 

Hiking

 

 

Sunshine Coast

From Vancouver take the Lion's Gate Bridge to West Vancouver and follow Tyler Way to the Upper Levels Highway and head towards Squamish. Exit at Horseshoe Bay to catch the ferry to Gibson's Landing on the Sunshine Coast.

  • Blackwater Trail - Intermediate/Expert, 3hrs, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Browne Creek - Easy, 3hrs, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Conshee Trail - Easy/Intermediate, 3hrs, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Mud Lake Trail - Intermediate, 4hrs, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Sweetwater Trail - Intermediate/Expert, 3hrs, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Suicide Creek - Intermediate, 4hrs, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Suicide Pass - Intermediate/Expert, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Willingdon Beach - Easy, 1hr, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Willingdon Creek - Easy, 1hr, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Coast and Mountains

    For more information on these hikes contact the Powell River Tourism office through thier website.

 

Cultus Lake Provincial Park

  • Teapot Hill - 5km return, Moderate
  • Seven Sisters - 3km Easy
  • Edmeston Road/Road 918 2.5km Easy
  • Giant Douglas Fir - As the name implies the trail leads to a old growth Douglas Fir / One and half hours return
  • Maple Bay - Intepretive Nature Trail

    Cypress Provincial Park

  • Hollyburn Mountain Trail - 6km Strenuous Description: This trail begins from the Hollyburn Ridge parking lot and climbs to the Hollyburn Mountain peak at 1,325 meters. The trail has an elevation change of 440 meters and should take about 2 1/2 hours to complete.
  • Black Mountain Loop Trail - 2.5km This trail takes you through sub-alpine meadows and around the edges of several mountain lakes. It is situated beside Black Mountain Plateau. This trail has a100 meter elevation change and should take about 1 3/4 hours to complete.
  • Lodge Trails - This is actually a network of trails of varying lengths and difficulties linking to other trails from Hollyburn Lodge at First Lake.
  • Yew Lake Trail - 1.5km, Easy This is a self-guided interpretive trail. It's an easy loop that goes through the forest, meadows and around small lakes, then returns to the base of the Black Chair lift. The trail should take about 45 min to complete.
  • Golden Ears Provincial Park

    The following are a grouping of the hiking and backpacking opportunities in the park. Consult with the park staff about conditions, closures as well as the degree of difficulty of the trails.

  • Allouette Mountain Hiking Trail - 10km, Difficult. This trail takes you to Alouette Mountain and has fantastic panoramic view of the area. This is a strenuous hike with elevation changes of 1000 meters and taking about 5 hours to complete one way. Golden Ears Provincial Park, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Mensies Trail - 9km, easy. This is a multi-use trail of horse/hike/bike. There is very little elevation change, making it an easy hike of about 3 to 5 hours.
    cover the park area.
  • Lookout and Loop Trails - 2.5km, easy. This is an easy loop trail that should take about 1 hour to complete. It goes from Parkway to Look Out and back.
  • Mike Lake Trail - 4.2 km, easy. This is a horse/hiking trail that takes you to Main Corral. It's an easy trail that should take you about 2hours and has an elevation change of about 100 meters.
  • Viewpoint Trail - 3km, easy. There is a beautiful waterfall that flows down a cliff just beyond the Lake Viewpoint during the wet seasons. The trails elevation change is about 150 meters. The triail should take about 1 1/2 hour to complete.
  • Incline Trail - 1.2km, moderate. The trail is a steep horse/hiking that takes you to Mike Lake. It should take about 1 hour and has an elevation change of 150 meters.
  • West Canyon Trail - 5km, easy. From the west canyon parking lot the trail follows an old logging road before turning sharply uphill. There is a short trail to Lower Falls.
  • Golden Ears Trail - 12km, very difficult. Head out on the West Canyon Trail until you reach Alder Flats. This trail climbs to Panoramic Ridge where you are rewarded with an incredible view of the area. From here you can ascend to the North Ear that takes you across a permanent snow field. In order to attempt this you must have the requisite equipment and skills. Designated campsites are available at Alder Flats and Panorama Ridge. The Panorama section has snowpack well into the summer. You can expect snow to fall in this area at any time of year. The trail should take about 7 hours one way and should only be attempted as an overnight backpacking trip. It has an and has an elevation change of 1500 meters.
  • Lower Falls Trail - 2.7km, Easy. This is a hiking trail only that is an easy walk along Gold Creek to Lower Falls. You'll pass a beach along the way that has some of the best mountain views in the park. It should take about 1 hour to complete and has very little elevation change.

    Manning Provincial Park

    The following are a grouping of the hiking and backpacking opportunities in the park. Consult with the park staff about conditions, closures as well as the degree of difficulty of the trails.

  • Lightning Lake Loop - 9 km return, moderate This is a 9 km loop trail that begins at Spruce Bay day use area that should take approximately 2 1/2 hours to complete.
  • Lightning Lake Chain - 12km, Easy but very long, This trail offers many routes, passes a number of lakes and is an easy walk with no elevation change. To arrive at Thunder Lake from the Day use area should take about 4 to 4 1/2 hours.
  • Castle Creek/Monument 78 Trail - 12km, Intermediate - long,This trail goes from the Monument 78 parking lot, along Castle Creek to the Monument. It wanders through meadows and can continue on to the Cascade Loop trail which is 54 km long, or joins the Pacific Crest trail to make a day loop taking approximately 3 1/2 hour to complete and has an elevation change of 200 meters.
  • Strawberry Flats/Three Falls Trails - Level of Difficulty: Easy - Long Description: This trail makes a 2 1/2 to 3 hour loop including arriving at a downhill ski area and passing falls,lt then makes its descent to trail's end. The total elevation change is 125 meters.
  • Heather Trail - 21km one way, Moderate - Very Long, This trail is a nice combination of fire road and trails through an old burn area then across gently rolling terrain.The trail brings you to a series of lakes, ridges and to the Hope Pass trail and ends up at Nicomen Ridge. The elevation change you can expect is 292 meters and the trail should take about 8 to 10 hours to complete.
  • Windy Joe Mountain Trail - 15km, Difficult - Long At the summit of this trail is a 360 degree panoramic display of mountains. You travel along an old fire access road to the top of Windy Joe. There is an old fire tower there that affords this view. It should take about 4 to 5 hours to complete this trail and the elevation change is 525 meters.
  • Pacific Crest Trail - This trail brings you to the beginning of the incredible PCT that is a 6 month 4,000 km trail along the Continental Divide. This 12 km, 4 hour trek returns by doubling back or via Castle Creek to Simikameen Trail to The Beaver Pond. The elevation gain to the beginning of the PCT is 450 meters.
  • Monument 83 Trail - 16 km one way, Moderate This trail takes you to the circa 1953 U.S. Forest Service lookout tower by following a fire access road. The elevation change will be 850 meters and the trail should take you about 5 hours to complete.
  • Poland Lake Trail - 8km one way, Moderate This trail begins at Strawberry Flats parking lot. Where you can fill your canteens with water at a small creek not far from the parking lot. The trail has an elevation change of 435 meters and should take approximately 3 hours to complete.
  • Bonnevier Trail - 29km one way, Moderate - Very Long A vehicle shuttle is suggested for this hike that will take approximately 10 to 12 hours to complete. This trail descends for 22 km to McDiarmed Meadows after a 5 km stretch on a fire road. The elevation change is 950 meters.
  • Grainger Creek Trail - 19.5 km one way, Difficult - Very Long, This trail follows an access fire road for 4 km then swings east and climbs steadily for 11 km to the western end of Nicomen Lake. You can camp at the northern end of the lake. This trail should take approximately 5 to 7 hours to complete and has an elevation change of 952 meters.
  • Skagit Bluffs Trail - 5.6 km one way, Difficult You can start at either the west or east ends of this trail, east being the Cayuse Flats and the west being the Cascade Recreation Area Parking lot. The hike is along parts of the old Dewdney Trail which is parallels or joins today's Hope Princeton Highway. The trail should take about 2 to 2 1/2 hours to complete and has a 225 meter elevation change.
  • Frosty Mountain Loop trail - 29.2 km round trip, Difficult, This trail takes you to the highest peak in the park. From the summit, there are spectacular views of the North Cascades. There is a gentler accent of 29.2 km from Lightning Lake Day Use Area or a 27.7 km loop starting at Beaver Pond. The trails take approximately 9 to 11 hours to compete and have an elevation change of 1,150 meters.
  • Skyline I Trail - 20.4 km round trip, Difficult This trail is a beautiful ascent to Skyline ridge where you'll have amazing views. It starts at Spruce Bay, climbing to the ridge with the elevation change being 775 meters in all. The trail then descends back to Spruce Bay. This all takes approximately 7 to 9 hours to complete.
  • Skyline II Trail - 12.5 km one way, Difficult This trail takes you to Mowich Camp in approximately 5 hours of hiking, at an elevation change of 469 meters. It drops into Despair Pass and goes past Snow Camp and Lone Goat Mountains. These are spectacular peaks and from mid July to mid August you will see and amazing display of wild flowers.

    Use Topographic Series Maps, Scale, 1:50,000, sheets 92H/02 (Manning Park) and 92H/03 (Skagit River) ) and 92H/07 (Princeton). These will cover most of the park and recreation areas that you'll need to hike in this area.

    Mount Seymour Provincial Park

    The following are a grouping of the hiking and backpacking opportunities in the park. Consult with the park staff about conditions, closures as well as the degree of difficulty of the trails.

  • Elsay Lake Trail - The trail is 7km long. This is a rugged trail that takes about 9 to 10 hours to complete and has an elevation change of 500 meters. A good hike for an experienced backpacker. The trail begins on the main Mount Seymour trail. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Mount Seymour Trail - 4 km with and elevation change of 450m. For a panoramic view of Vancouver take this 2 1/2 to 3 hour trail to First and Second Bump Peaks. On a clear day you might see all the way to the Gulf Islands and some say all the way to Vancouver Island. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Mystery Lake Trail - On a hot summer day this is a good trail to choose. It should take about 45 min to get to the lake with an elevation change of 180 meters along the way. At the end of the trail you'll find a nice spot to swim. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Old Buck Access Trail - 1km This is a short trail that should take you only about 30 min. to complete and has minimal elevation change. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Old Buck Logging Road - 2.3 km / 7.8 km, Moderate. Old Buck Logging Road takes you to Baden-Powell Trail Junction. You can stop there after about 45 minutes of hiking or if you're feeling ambitions go on to the Perimeter Trail Junction which will take you 2 hours to complete. Overall the elevation change is about 670 meters. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Old Cabin Trail - 430m, Easy. This is an easy 20 min. walk that has an elevation change of only 25 meters. This trail connects the Perimeter Trail junction and parking lot 1. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Perimeter Trail - 1.5 km, easy. This is a beautiful trail that begins at Deep Cove lookout and goes to the junction of The Goldie Lake Trail. It has an elevation change of 240 meters and should take approximately 45 min to complete. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • The Mushroom Parking Lot Trail - 750m, easy. The trail heads towards the skiing area from the Vancouver Lookout parking lot. Its an easy hike that has minimal elevation change. It should only take about 15 min to complete. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • First Lake Loop - Dog Mountain Trails -This is a series of loops from 1 to 3 km. You travel through dense sub-alpine old-growth forest heading to First Lake and the junction of the trails to Dog Mountain or Mount Seymour, either option affords spectacular views. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Flower Lake Loop Trail - 1.5km, easy. This is an easy 45 min. walk that has a 150 meter elevation change. This is a good trail for spotting a variety of birds as it passes through subalpine areas of bogs and ponds. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Goldie Lake Loop Trail - 2km, easy. This is a loop trail that takes approximately 2 hours to complete. It is a self guided interpretive trail and it ends up at Goldie Lake. It also takes you to the Flower Lake Trail and the Perimeter trail system from the top end. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Horse Trail - 2.5km, easy. This trail is an old logging road that forms a loop. An easy hike but the trail is multi-use, so watch out for mountain bikers. Mount Seymour Provincial Park, Lower Mainland, Vancouver Coast and Mountains

Skagit Valley Provincial Park

The following are a grouping of the hiking and backpacking opportunities in the park. Consult with the park staff about conditions, closures as well as the degree of difficulty of the trails.

  • Skagit River Trail - 14.5km Intermediate, 6 hours one way.An extended hike which follows the Skagit River into Manning Provincial Park. You can connect to the Silver Daisy Trail.The trail head is accessible from 26 mile bridge south of the Silvertip Campground turnoff. The wilderness campsite is about 10.5km from the trailhead. The trail can be accessed from the Manning side from a trailhead off highway 3. Skagit Valley Provincial Park, Fraser Valley, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Centennial Trial - The trail connects the Skagit River Trail and the Skyline II trail. It essentially runs parallel to the Silver/Skagit Road which is the parks main road. Access is available from 26 mile bridge, south of the Silvertip Campground turnoff, Shawatum Bar parking lot further south or the Skyline II parking lot to the north of the Ross Lake Reservoir. Skagit Valley Provincial Park, Fraser Valley, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Silver Daisy Trail - Difficult. Starts in the park following along side Silver Daisy Creek it then branches to the summit of Silver Daisy Mountain for a one way trip of 10km. The trails other branch continues on into Manning Provincial Park. Access is easiest from the Manning side of the Skagit River Trail, from the trailhead on highway 3. See the Skagit River Trail description. Skagit Valley Provincial Park, Fraser Valley, Vancouver Coast and Mountains
  • Skyline ll Trail - 12.5km (one way), Difficult. This is considered by many to be the areas most beautiful trail. It's easily accessible from the parking lot trailhead just north of the Ross Lake Reservoir. A short distance in the trail connects to the Centennial Trail which you make take north into the park. If you continue on the Skyline you'll head into Manning Provincial Park where you'll find backcountry camping at Mowich. Skagit Valley Provincial Park, Fraser Valley, Vancouver Coast and Mountains

 

Whistler Mountain - Gondola Access

Paleface Trail - 1km, easy, loop, elevation gain 85m, The trail is a loop which starts just under the top station of the Whistler Village gondola and heads out to a view point.

Ridge Lookout - 1.2km, intermediate, linear, elevation gain 72m. This short linear trail starts just beside the Roundhouse Lodge and heads up to it's name sake, the Ridge Lookout which provides and excellent viewpoint.

Glacier Trail - 2.5km, easy, linear, elevation gain 85m The trail starts out following the along the Ridge Lookout trail than quickly branches off and continues on to hte edge of the Glacier. While the glacier is closed, the trail provides a good viewpoint for visually exploring it.

Harmony Loop - 3.5km, intermediate, linear trail and loop, elevation gain 113m The trail starts beside the Roundhouse Lodge and heads out to a small pond. While it's big enough for a dip - don't do it, it's completely freezing melt waters! The trail then follows out through the loop section which provides some impressive viewpoints before heading back to the pond where you retrace your path back to the start.

Harmony Meadowns - 2.6km, intermediate, loop (take the Harmony Lake Trail back), elevation gain 50m The trail starts out following the Harmony Lake Trail then branches off on it's own to allow you some good view points over Fitzsimmons Valley.

Musical Bumps - expert, linear, elevation gain 150m You can reach the trail by following either the Harmony Meadows or Harmnony Lake trails. The trail continues up along Harmony Ridge, passed Symphony Bowl and Lake where it's intersected by Burnt Stew (which you can use to create a return loop). The trail then follows along the boundary with spectacular Garibaldi Provincial Park before heading into the park to Singing Pass. If your backpacking you can continue into the park to Russet Lake where you'll find campsites and a hut - but you must be fully self sufficiant, with a full complement of backcountry skills and gear. Another option is to hire a qualified local guide and rent equipment.

Little Whistler Way - 3.8km, expert, linear, elevation gain 265m The trail starts beside the Roundhouse Lodge and follows around Whistler Glacier where it intersects the Burnt Stew Trail at Peak Road. The trail provides a nice view into Garibaldi Park.

Burnt Stew - 2.2km, expert, linear, elevation gain 100m The trail begins at the terminus of Little Whistler Trail anf follows above Garibaldi Park boundary to intersect with the Singing Pass Trail, which you can use as a return loop.

Peak Road - 0.9km, expert, linear, elevation gain 85m. To reach Peak Road you take Little Whistler Trail to its terminus. The trail continues around Whistler Glacier where it comes to an end. Provides some very nice views of the area. To return you have to retrace your steps.

Village Descent - Intermediate (Down), Expert (UP), 10km one way, elevation gain 915m, Meanders down the mountain, making use of the ski trails, some excellent views of the valley.

Chilliwack Forest District

  • Sumas Mountain Trail - 12km, 700m elevation gain, joins Chadsey Lake Loop Trail, lookouts,
  • Denham Trail - 6.2km, around Weaver Lake
  • Harrison Lookout Trail - 2km, 350m elevation gain, difficult, lookouts
  • Mount Outram Trail - 7.5km, 1760m elevation gain into the alpine, lookouts
  • Eaton Lake Trail - 6.5km, 880m elevation gain, difficult
  • Williams Peak - 5.5km, 1400m elevation gain, difficult
  • Mount Cheam Trail - 3.8km to peak, elevation gain 632m, lookouts
  • Elk Thurston Trail - 7.3km, 1010m elevation gain
  • Centennial Trail - 14km along the Chilliwack River
  • Vedder Mountain Trail - 5.7km, elevation gain 375m
  • Devils Lake Trail - .3km to lake
  • Rolley Falls Trail - 2km loop, elevation gain 130m, water falls
  • Hoover Lake Trail - 3.8km to Hoover Lake, 300m elevation gain
  • Ford Mountian Trail - 1.7km, 900m elevation gain, lookouts
  • Campbell Lake Trail - 4.8km, 610 elevation gain, difficult
  • Stave Falls Interpretation - 1.65km, 150m elevation gain, easy

 

Squamish Forest District

  • Lions Trail (Binkert Trail) - 15km out and back, 1280m elevation gain, lookouts, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Deeks Lake Trail - 14km out and back, 1190 elevation gain, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Utopia Lake Trail - 20km out and back, 1390 elevation gain, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Petgill Lake Trail - 9.5km, 640m elevation gain, lookouts, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Brohm Lake Trail - 1.5km loops, easy, mountain biking, lookouts, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Brew Lake Trail - 13km out and back, 1200 elevation gain to alpine meadows, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Cal-Cheak/Brandywine Trial - 8km, easy, lookouts, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Brandywine Meadows Triails - 10km out and back, 670m elevation gain, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Rainbow Lake Trail - 18km, elevation gain 825m, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Gaint Cedars Trail - 4km out and back, 150m, mountain biking, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Tenquille Lake Trail #1 - 12km out and back, 450m, climbing, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Tenquille Lake Trail #2 - 19km, 1460m, difficult, climbing, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Owls Lake Trail - 7km, 140m elevation gain, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Mount Ronayne Trail - 34km out and back, 750km elevation gain, climbing, campsites, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Lizzie Creek Trail - 10km, 640m elevation rise, climbing, campsites, lookouts, Contact Squamish Forest District
  • Gold Rush Trail - Contact Squamish Forest District

    Even a day hike in a wilderness environment like Coast and Mountains region can put you at risk without the proper knowledge of safety in the backcountry. Snowpack may delay trail openings, there can be snowfall in the high country even in July. Always carry a watch along with a map and compass and know how to use them. Bring extra clothing, food and drink along with sunscreen and let someone responsible know your route and planned time of return. If you're planning to hike the trails at the top of the mountain ensure your route will get you back before the last trip down. Consult with local authorities about conditions, bear closures and weather and never hike alone.

    Out-There's Backpacking and Hiking
    Out-There's British Columbia
    British Columbia - Official Site

    Finally for those of you who can't help bringing a stop watch along on your hike there's the world famous Grouse Grind. This easily accessible 2.9km trail has an elevation gain of 853m (2,800ft) and takes about 1.5hrs to complete for most mortals. For those with piston pumps instead of hearts the men's record is under 30 minutes and the woman's is under 35. You can of course take the Gondola down after you've finished abusing yourself. For more information, opening and closing times as well as short term and seasonal closing see the Greater Vancouver Regional Development (GVRD) website.


 

Horse Riding, Packing & Guest Ranches

Surrounding Region


These listings are to be used only as a reference and in no way constitute a guide to backcoutry travel in the areas described. Out-There is a clearing house for outdoor information not an information source. For more information contact the the local outdoor shops, clubs, associations, land managers and tourism offices for the area regarding routes, access and conditions.

 

 

Resources

Vancouver Coast and Mountains

Whistler

Out-There's Whistler
Out-There's British Columbia


Related Features

Cultus Lake Provincial Park
Cypress Provincial Park
Garibaldi Provincial Park
Golden Ears Provincial Park
Manning Provincial Park
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
Skagit Valley Provincial Park

 

Other Links of Interest

Out-There's Destinations

Banff
Montreal
Mont Tremblant
Toronto
Whistler

 

 

 

All web site contents copyright 1995-2005 by White Cat Media
 
Click here if you have arrived at this page without
the navigation bar on the left