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  Beached Kayaks   Surrounded by oceans on three sides and encompassing the world's largest freshwater lakes, kayakers can't help but love this country. On the west coast you can paddle with Orcas in Robson Bight Eco Reserve and the waters of Johnston Strait between the mainland and Vancouver Island. Further west paddlers can spend days exploring the islands of Clayoquot or Barkley Sound. In the country's heartland, Georgian Bay and Lake Superior offer exceptional paddling without the tides and salt. For an even more civilized option launch from the shores of St. Lawrence Islands National Park and head out to one of the campsites in the Thousand Islands. The fjords of the Saguenay are one of Quebec's finest areas for visitors to the province to explore, with whale watching an option in the south.  
 

Barkley Sound - The Broken Group - Pacific Rim National Park

The Broken Group in Barkley Sound south of Ucluelet is within the Pacific Rim National Parks boundaries and forms one of the three areas which make up the park (Long Beach and the West Coast Trail being the others). You'll find dozens of islands to explore with campsites and beautiful beaches, many of which can be found in the more protected inner islands of the group. Thorugh the park where you can get current information about local conditions and the best launch points - check with the park before you leave. The best access to the area is out of Port Alberni on the MV Lady Rose. The ship will drop you, your kayak and gear off just outside the islands at Sechart and pick you up at a pre-determined time in the future. Another alternative launch site is Torquart Bay which can be reached from a logging road ( knowledge of travel on BC logging roads is essential and a 4x4 is recommended) that branches off Highway 4 at Kennedy Lake. Launching from either Bamfield or Ucluelet requires an extended exposed crossing to the islands and is best left to the experts. In the inner islands you'll find camping areas at Hand, Gibralter, Dodd, Willis and Turret Islands. The outer group has camping on Clarke, Benson and Gilbert Islands. Camping fees are levied and group sizes are restricted by the park. Bring your own drinking water, a cooking stove and practice no trace camping. Charts and tide tables are essential.

For more information see our features on Pacific Rim, Vancouver Island and Pacific Rim National Park as well as the Parks Canada website. West Coast Paddler has more information on the area. Barkley Sound | Grey Whales | Bald Eagles - From Wikipedia

Note: In many areas the islands waters, particulary in the outer islands, can be extremely dangerous with rocky shoals, surging surf, strong currents and heavy fog that can engulf you very quickly. Weather can change quickly. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions. If you're not an expert paddler with cold water, surf, ocean navigation and tidal skills - hire a guide.

Barkley Sound - The Deer Group

The Deer group is also located in Barkley Sound closer to Bamfield. This group of islands is becoming popular with kayakers. Less developed and less crowded, if you looking for more solitude this might be an option. Campsites are not designated and are definitely at a premium due to the nature of the islands. Much of the area is crown land but not all. You must seek permission to camp on first nations land prior to setting out. The launch point for the Deer's is just outside Bamfield at Port Desire. If your not well versed in Ocean Kayaking this isn't a good choice for paddling.

Wildlife includes martens, otters, grey whales, orcas and bald eagles. Bring your own drinking water, a cooking stove and practice no trace camping. Charts and tide tables are essential. There are no toilet facilities so plan ahead before you go. Barkley Sound | Grey Whales | Bald Eagles - Wikipedia

For more information see our features on Pacific Rim, Vancouver Island.

Note: In many areas the islands waters, particulary in the outer islands, can be extremely dangerous with rocky shoals, surging surf, strong currents and heavy fog that can engulf you very quickly. Weather can change quickly. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions. If you're not an expert paddler with cold water, surf, ocean navigation and tidal skills - hire a guide.

 

Clayoquot Sound

North of the Pacific Rim National Park above Tofino you'll find a spectacular area for paddling, Clayoqout Sound. Made up of an array of islands, reaches and passages, the area is spectacularly beautiful. You'll find several hiking and backpacking trails as well as sandy beaches and rain forest. Wildlife abounds including sea lions, porpoises and even grey whales. Some of the major islands in the sound are Flores, Vargas and Meares. There are a number of Provincial Marine parks in Clayoquot where you'll find primitive campsites. The provincial park on Vargas allows wilderness camping (leave no trace) as does Flores. Gibson Marine also has camping. If you have the equipment, supplies and skills for an extended paddle one of the nicest (but increasingly more popular) destinations is Hot Springs Cove in Maquinna Provincial Park. You'll find gear rentals, instructors and schools in Tofino. You can launch directly from Tofino. Bring your own drinking water, a cooking stove and practice no trace camping. Charts and tide tables are essential. For more information see our features on Tofino, Vancouver Island and Pacific Rim National Park as well as the BC Parks website.

Note: In many areas Clayoquot's waters can be extremely dangerous with rocky shoals, surging surf, strong currents and heavy fog that can engulf you very quickly. Many routes are exposed to the open pacific. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions. Charts and tide tables are essentail. If you're not an expert paddler with cold water, surf, ocean navigation and tidal skills - hire a guide.

| Friends of Clayoquot Sound | Clayoqout Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve | Clayoquot Whales | Grey Whales | Bald Eagles | Clayoquot Sound - Wikipedia

 

Gulf Islands - Gulf Islands National Park

The Gulf Islands are one of North America's best areas for sea kayakers, with fascinating coves, bays, beaches and reaches in a largely protected ocean setting. The parks campsites are located on a number of islands, allowing you to use the park as an overnight destination, a weekend get away or an extended vacation. Kayakers should be thoroughly familiar with cold water conditions, tides and navigation and be equipped properly before setting out. Weather can turn suddenly in the area so check and monitor marine weather forecasts. Boat traffic is significant in the islands during high season and large ferries move through the area constantly. Some of the islands waters have strong tidal currents (some running far faster than a kayaker can paddle) and rough waters, consult with the park about you're planned route before setting out.

Beaumont Park - Bedwell Harbour off South Pender, Water Access Only. The park has 11 walk-in campsites, drinking water, picnic areas, toilets, an anchorage and a Canadian Customs office in the high season. Supplies are available at nearby Bedwell Harbour Village.

Cabbage Island - North east of Tumbo Island, Water Access Only. The park has 8 walk-in campsites, a beach, a picnic area and toilets. There are also a number of buoys for moorage off shore. Tumbo island is just off of Saturna Island. The east side of Tumbo is exposed to the waters of the broader straight.

D'Arcy Island - East of the Saanich Peninsula and south of Sidney Island in Haro Straight, Water Access Only. There are several buoys for mooring and a small beach. The park has rustic campsites for overnight stays.

Prevost Island - Located off the end of Salt Spring's Long Harbour northwest of Pender and southwest of Galiano Island.The island has separate areas set aside as part of the National Park. The area with camping and hiking trails is located at the north end of the island at Selby Cove and James Bay.

Princess Margaret (Portland Island) - South of Salt Spring Island not far from the mouth of Fulford Harbour. The Island has three campgrounds located around the islands perimeter. There are hiking trails that cris cross the island and provide a terrestrial connection to each. The island has a pump for water. Satellite Channel which seperates the island from Salt Spring is the major ferry route in the Gulf Islands.

Sidney Spit - East of the Saanich Peninsula on the north end of Sidney Island.The park is known for its exceptional sandy beaches. There are 35 buoys for moorage along the shores of the park and 24 walk-in campsites, vault toilets and picnic areas.

Isle-de-lis (Rum Island) - Between Stuart and Sidney Island, Water Access Only. The park has a few walk-in campsites as well as some walking trails.

There are also a number of excellent Provincial Park campsites in the area which you can also take advantage of.

Discovery Island Marine Park - East of Victoria off of Oak Bay where Haro meets Juan de Fuca Straight, Water Access Only. There are no designated campsites but their is an area for camping. Vault toilets are available. No moorage for boaters. While this is a popular kayaking destination the open water crossing from the mainland can be treacherous - best bet hire a guide.

Note: If you're not an intermediate or expert paddler, you should hire a guide. Many of the camping areas do not have water so ensure you bring along an adequate supply. Some of the channels see constant ferry traffic. These large boats move much faster than they appear to and often can't see something as small as a kayak. Correct timing of channel crossings is essential! Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

Gulf Islands, Salt Spring Island, Galiano Island

Maps - Salt Spring, Galiano, Mayne, Penders, Saturna, Gabriola

For a listing of the Provincial Parks in the Gulf Islands follow the link.

Gulf Islands National Park - From Out-There - Canada's National Parks

 

Lake Superior - Lake Superior Provincial Park

The parks coast presents lots of opportunities for intermediate to expert kayakers but there aren't a lot of sheltered coves or networks of islands to explore. Novices should think about hiring a guide. The parks coastline is about 120km long and would take about 5 to 7 days to paddle. Be aware that the weather can change in an instant and fog can roll in at any time and may stay for several days. While Lake Superior is a renown kayaking destination the park's shoreline is largely exposed, with many sections bordered by sheer cliffs, that will prevent landings in the event that the weather turns. Superior is usually calmest in June and July. Access points are Agawa Bay Campground, Sinclair Cove, Katherine Cove, Gargantua Harbour, Old Woman Bay, Michipicoten River and Michipicoten Bay. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

Out-There's Lake Superior Provincial Park

 

Lake Superior - Pukaskwa National Park

The parks' coast is accessible for intermediate to expert kayakers, novices should hire a guide. For ambitious paddlers the traditional trip is from Hatttie Cove at the north of the park to Michipicoten, a good distance south east of the park. This is an extended paddle which will take from 10 to 14 days. Be aware that the weather can change in an instant and fog can roll in at any time and stay for days on end (budget one in four days where you'll be tent bound due to conditions.) While Lake Superior is a renown kayaking destination the park's shoreline is largely exposed, with areas that make landings difficult or even impossible in the event that the weather turns. They say that Superior is usually calmest in June and July. For those with lesser skills the area around Hattie Cove makes for a nice day paddle but don't venture too far from the sheltered bays. Remember Superior's waters average a bone chilling 4° C. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

Out-There's Pukaskwa National Park

 

Georgian Bay (Lake Huron) - Georgian Bay Islands National Park

The park is a "boaters park" and is a spectacular area for sea kayaking with endless channels, bays and inlets to explore. You can sea kayak from island to island or just kayak to the large island, Beausoleil and go exploring. You'll find great camping on one of the 192 sites at any of the 15 campgrounds on the big island. Be aware the parks waters have a lot of boat traffic and even thought much of the area is protected, great storms can arise in a surprisingly short time. Only very experience kayakers should venture onto the unsheltered back of the island. Make sure your route doesn't exceed your capabilities. If you're not an intermediate or advanced kayaker, hire a guide to help you explore the park. Georgian Bay is a huge body of water, usually very choppy, prone to fogs and very cold. Storms can brew up in a minute so check the weather conditions if you go. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

Out-There's Georgian Bay Islands National Park

 

Georgian Bay (Lake Huron) - Bruce Peninsula National Park

The park is exceptional for sea kayakers (see the outfitters section if you need a rental or guide). The waters off the park have endless possibilities for paddlers. For some lazy paddling, the west side of the park has a lot of beaches and some easy off-shore areas. To the north and to the east, the park is bounded by the Escarpment and the paddling is exceptional but should be left to expert or guided paddlers. There are a number of sunken wrecks, which may be observed from the waters surface (don't enter these areas when divers are active) near Tobermory. Advanced paddlers can head out to Flower Pot Islands off the coast. The area's waters alternate in color from a deep emerald green to various shades of aquamarine. The eroding limestone cliffs, large caves and rocky white beaches make for great exploration. If you're looking for an overnight trip, you can start from Tobermory and work your way down to the wilderness campsites in the park (reserve in advance) . There is also a camping area on Flowerpot Island in Fathom Five National Marine Park located just off Tobermory. The campsites are available on a first come basis and there are only six sites. Advanced kayakers can paddle to the sites after picking up permits. Bad weather may pin you down for days, so be sure to bring extra supplies. For information on Fathom Five see Parks Canada's Website. Check with the park for accessibility and availability. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

Note: The weather in the area is extremely variable and difficult to predict, particularly in the early or late part of the season (even for the meteorologists). The peninsula is surrounded by an inland sea and the waters can become dangerous in the blink of an eye. Along the cliffs, landings may be impossible and reflected waves may be a real concern. Water temperatures are very low at any time of year and hypothermia is an ever present danger.

Out-There's Bruce Peninsula National Park

 

Georgian Bay (Lake Huron) - Killarney Provincial Park

There are never ending possibilities for kayaking in this area. One standout is the archipelago east of the park, between it's shores and Manitoulin Island. The area is made up of endless inlets and islands and has great potential as a prime destination but is difficult to access. The second area is south of the park, in and around Phillip Edward Island and out to the Fox Islands. There are thousands of small islands in the vicinity and the area is a standout when it comes to beauty. Sea kayaking in the park is relatively undeveloped. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.


Note: Georgian Bay/Lake Huron is essentially an inland sea where the weather can turn in very short order. Ocean kayaking skills are essential, navigation skills, charts, compass and a weather radio are essential. if you aren't a seasoned kayaker, please contact an outfitter or guide in the area. Remember these lakes are scattered with the remains of large ships and freighters.

Note: The park has a can and bottle ban in the interior which is enforced all year long.

Out-There's Killarney Provincial Park

 

St. Lawrence River - Bic Provincial Park (Rimouski)

Bic is one of the best places we know of for sea kayaking in Quebec (Forillion and of course the Saguenay are other outstanding areas). The bays, inlets, islands and of course the wildlife are good reasons why you should paddle here. If you are new to ocean kayaking, Bic is a good introduction to the challenges brought to you by the tides and ocean waters. Guides are highly recommended. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

Out-There Bic Provincial Park

 

St. Lawrence River - Iles de Boucherville (Montreal)

While the park is well know for it's cycling, paddlers have a leisurely 28km circuit, which wraps around the outer edges of Ile Saint-Jean, Ile-a-Pinard and Ile-de-la-Commune. This is a great paddle for nature lovers, where you can scour the marshes and river banks for wildlife. The route is protected from the broader St Lawrence and it's stronger currents (although you are in narrow channels of the river on the north and south sides of the circuit). You can rent canoes and kayaks (good ones too) in the park or you can bring your own. If you bring your own boat, be aware that their is no direct access to a launching point, so you'll have to portage, carry or drag your floating friend a short distance to a put-in. Inquire with the park regarding the conditions and your proposed route.

Out-There's Iles de Boucherville

 

St. Lawrence River - Thousand Islands, St. Lawrence Islands National Park, Ivy Lee

This is a wonderful area for sea kayakers to explore. Depending on you launch site and your objective, this can be a paddle in the park or something akin to an expedition. The islands stretch from Brockville in the east to Kingston in the west (and for avid paddlers you don't have to stop there). The St. Lawrence Islands National Park has dozens of campsites available for paddlers (and sailors). From Kingston to Brockville (west to east) these include the following:

  • Cedar- 4 campsites, 102m dockage at two locations
  • Milton- 3 campsites
  • McDonald - 13 campsites, 275m dockage
  • Beau Rivage - 8 campsites, picnic shelter, 290m dockage
  • Aubrey - 8 campsites, 214m of dockage
  • Endymion - Camping is Closed - 7 mooring bouys, south bay
  • Camelot - 6 campsites, 173m of dockage, 6 mooring bouys
  • Mulcaster - 3 campsites, 143m of dockage
  • Gordon - 5 campsites, picnic shelter, 295m of dockage
  • Georgina - 2 campsites 263m of dockage
  • Grenadier (North) - 2 campsites, service dock
  • Grenadier (South) - 17 campsites, group camp campground, washroom, 273m dockage
  • Grenadier (East) - 3 campsites, shallow dock
  • Mallory Town Landing (north shore) - Group campground, parking
  • Stovin - 2 campsites, 194m dockage

Note: There is no camping on the parks other islands. Boaters should be aware that use of generators is restricted in some areas, contact the park for details.

The parks of the St. Lawrence is responsible for Ivy Lea campground which is also accessible to kayakers. The Municipality of Brockville provides a number of campsites on islands just off of St. Lawrence Park. The park recently acquired a significant amount of new property including the Landon Bay Centre (which has front country camping) and an extensive trail system. Contact the park regarding these facilities. Some launch points for the area include Kingston, Gananoque, Mallory Town and Brockville (St. Lawrence Park). The best source of detailed information on sea kayaking in the area is available on the Thousand Islands Water Trail website. For more information on camping, routes and conditions contact the park through the Parks Canada website. Parks of the St. Lawrence | Camping in the Parks of the St. Lawrence | Kingston | Gananoque | Brockville | Eastern Ontario | Ontario - From Out-There

Note: This is one of Canada's (and the United States) most popular boating and recreation destinations and it also encompasses a major shipping channel. This makes paddling even more of a thinking mans sport. The Thousand Islands have changeable weather and may have difficult or impossible winds, sudden fogs, along with swift currents, narrow channels. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions. If you don't have the skills hire a guide.

 

Bay of Fundy - Fundy National Park

There is sea kayaking off the park in the Bay of Fundy with the best launch point being Alma. The park has a variety of coastline with cliffs, coves, beaches, sea stacks and even sea caves. The tide can rise and fall over 10m, quickly changing the shoreline as you go. There are a number of streams and rivers which you can explore on route. Unless you well seasoned in sea kayaking it is highly recommended you hire a guide or touring company. Be aware there are many dangers inherent in kayaking the bay. With tides and currents like few other places on earth, fast moving fog banks, along with waters that hover just above freezing all year round. Weather can turn quickly and landings may be impossible along some stretches of shoreline. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

Out-There's Fundy National Park

 

Northumberland Strait (Atlantic Coast NB) - Kouchibouguac National Park

Without a doubt this has got to be one of the best places to introduce new comers to the sport of sea kayaking on the Atlantic Coast. Most of the parks shore line is made up of lagoons protected by sand dunes. There are salt marshes, river mouths, beaches and islands. The tides, the sea birds and the grey and harbour seals all add to the adventure making the area a great introduction to salt water paddling. If you want to spend the night out, there is a wilderness campsite with 4 placements at Pointe-a-Maxime on the Saint Louis Lagoon. Rentals are available at Ryans near South Kouchibouguac campground. Unless you are an experience sea kayaker do not venture around the dunes, stay in the protected waters off shore. Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

 
 

Bay of Fundy - Cape Chingnecto Nova Scotia

Cliffs, Currents and the Highest Tides on Earth

The year was l756. The small group of Acadians dragged birch bark canoes over the slippery expanse of cobblestone as the rising tide followed. On the crest of the barrier beach they rested, contemplating the sight in silence. There was no sign of human habitation. The deeply incised valley sliced into the sheer escarpment, opening up slopes of dense coastal forest ... more

 
 

PEI North Shore - Atlantic Coast PEI

I had almost stepped into it with my bare and susceptible feet when the warning shot out from behind. With a start I looked down at what at first seemed just an innocuous expanse of sand and scattered vegetation. But I had stopped just in time. Before me, reaching back to the dunes, were hundreds of short, woody shrubs that would have certainly meant... more

 

Consult with local outfitters, retailers, park authorities and local tourism offices for detailed information about you route and local conditions.

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Montreal

  • ABC Cycles - 5584 Ave. Du Parc, Outremont, Montreal
  • Altitude Sports Plain Air - Outdoor Gear Retailer, Montreal, Montreal, Quebec
  • Andre Jac Sport - Outdoor Gear Retailer, 5520, boul des Laurentides, Laval
  • Andre Lalonde Sport - Outdoor Retailer, Multiple Locations, Montreal & Laval
  • Atmosphere - Outdoor Gear, Multiple Locations, Montreal
  • Le Baron - Outdoor Gear Montreal, Montreal, Quebec
  • Bicycle Eddy - 6431 Monk, NDG
  • Bicyclettes Tranquille - 9611 Lasalle Blvd, LaSalle, Montreal
  • Boutique Couririer - Endurance Sports, Outremont, Pointe-Claire, Westmount, Montreal
  • Boutique Lafuma - 2180 Crescent Street, Downtown, Montreal
  • Caroule - Retail, Bike & Inline Skate Rentals, 27 De la Commune Street E., Old Montreal
  • La Cordee - Outdoor Gear Retailer, Bicycles, Camping, Canoe, Kayak and Climbing Equipment Rental, 2159 St. Catherine St. E., Montreal, 2777 St. Martin Blvd. W., Laval
  • Cycle Pop - 1000 Rachel East, Montreal
  • Detour Nature - Kayak and Canoe Rentals (Groups), Paddling School, Guided Trips, Transportation, 154 rue Villeray Montréal
  • Doug Anakin Sports - Cross Country & Backcountry Ski Rentals - 454A Beaconsfield Blvd., 514-695-0785, Beaconsfield
  • Foot Locker - Athletic Footwear, Multiple Locations, Montreal
  • Fraser Sports - Traditional Sports, 39-a Donnegani, Pointe-Claire, West Island, Montreal
  • Inukshuk - Montreal Outdoor Retailer, Rents Kayaks, Snowshoes, Camping Equipment, Montreal
  • Joe Sports - Traditional Sports, Downtown, West Island, Montreal
  • Kanuk - 485 Rachel, E., Montreal
  • Maison de Sport - Traditional Sports, Downtown & West Island, Montreal
  • Maison des Cyclistes 1251 Rachel E., Montreal
  • Marseille Bicycle & Sports - 6915, Marseille St., Montreal
  • Martin-Swiss - 313 Victoria, Westmount, Montreal
  • McWhinnies Cycle - 6010 Sherbrooke West, NDG, Montreal
  • Mountain Equipment Co-op - 8989, l'Acadie, Marché Central, Montreal
  • Nordic Norway - Outdoor Gear Retailer, Kayak Rentals, 127 Ste-Anne St., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Montreal
  • Oberson - Snowboards - Brossard and Montreal
  • La Porte a Bicyclette - 4308 Hotel-de-Ville, Montreal
  • Pro Sports - Traditional Sports, Downtown, West Island, Montreal
  • Quilicot Bicycles - 1749 St-Denis, Downtown, Montreal
  • Robert Cycle & Sports - 9031 Airlie street, LaSalle
  • Rousseau Sports - Traditional Sports, Multiple Locations, Montreal, Laval, South Shore
  • Sport G.S. - Sport G.S. - 1135 boul. Arthur Sauvé Blvd., Laval
  • Sports Experts - Outdoor Retailer, Several Locations, Montreal
  • St-Laurent Cycles - 1344 Du Collège, St. Laurent, Montreal
  • Vélo 2000- Longquile, St-Hubert, Monteregie
  • Velo Adventure - Retail, Bike Rentals, Conveyor Pier, Old Port, Montreal
  • Velo Montreal - Retail, Bike Rentals
  • Velo Trizone - 112, Boul. Curé Labelle, Laval
  • Yeti Sports - Outdoor Retailer, Rents Camping, Snowshoeing, and Backcountry Skiing Gear, 5190, boul. Saint-Laurent, Montreal (Also Trois Riviere and Shawnigan)

    Quebec - Montreal the Surrounding Regions

  • Aqua Plein Air - Outdoor Gear, Sainte Therese, Laurentians
  • Atmosphere - Outdoor Gear, St. Sauveur, Laurentians
  • Le Bivouac - Outdoor Gear, 210 rue Principale, Granby, Eastern Townships
  • La Cordee - Outdoor Gear, Rents almost all outdoor equipment, Laval
  • Cycles Dussault - Bicycles, Morin Heights, Laurentians
  • En Equilibre - Snowboards, Skateboards, Boul. de la Concorde E.
  • Hudson Village Cycle - Hudson
  • Intersport Jacque Champoux - Snowboards, 74 rue St-Vincent, Ste-Agathe-des-Monts
  • Oberson - Snowboards - Montreal and Brossard
  • Le Outlet Audvik - Outdoor Retailer, Vaudreuil-Dorion, Monteregie
  • Performance Board Shop - Snowboards, Saint-Sauveur, Laurentians
  • Phenix Sport - Canoe, Bicycle Rentals, P'tit Train du Nord & Riviere du Nord, Val David, Laurentians
  • Primeau Velo - Bicycles, Brossard
  • Rousseau Sports - Traditional Sports, Multiple Locations, Montreal, Laval, South Shore
  • Roy Folland Wooden Kayaks - Hudson, Monteregie
  • South Parc - 8100 Taschereau Blvd., Brossard, Monteregie
  • Sport Direct - Bicycles, Valleyfield
  • Sport Vélo Plein Air - Bicycles (819) 278-3655, Mont-Laurier, Laurentians
  • Le Suroit - Outdoor Retailer, Vaudreuil-Dorion, Monteregie
  • Velo Chambly - Bicycles, 1731 Bourgogne, Chambly, Monteregie

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