Canadian Wilderness Lodging
 
Wheelers Hut, Rogers Pass,  Glacier National Park   Canada is renown for it's magnificent wilderness. One of the best ways to enjoy this natural playground is to take advantage of of one of the countries innumerable backcountry facilities. Depending on your activity, fitness and skill level, as well as comfort requirements you can choose from backcountry cabins, huts,  yurts or wilderness resorts and lodges.
Wheeler Hut, Rogers Pass, Glacier National Park, BC
 

Backcountry Resorts and Lodges

If you're visiting Canada, don't miss a chance to stay at one of the countries backcountry lodges or resorts. This is one of the finest ways to experience Canada's vast and varied wilderness. The lodges and resorts are located in the most beautiful areas of the back country which means that most of them aren't accessible by car. To reach your destination you might be required to hike, ski (may require backcountry gear) or snowshoe in. Distances vary but they are usually in the 10 to 30km range. Some like Lake O'Hara have a shuttle (with limited space, so book well in advance) while others have more exotic access, like a helicopter charter. Located on isolated islands, or deep in mysterious rain forests, high in the Canadian Rockies or thousands of miles from civilization in our legendary northern reaches there are many different experiences to choose from.The facilities vary widely, ranging from cozy cabins, to stately rooms luxuriously appointed with finest of furnishings. Meals may be self catered or perhaps prepared by some of the countries finest chefs. Advanced bookings are essential, whatever your choice. Be sure to check with your chosen host or operator for all of the details. Just prior to your visit, contact the lodge or operator to check on current weather and access conditions. 

Yurts

Yurts are tent structures, once commonly used by the nomadic peoples of Mongolia. Not unlike a round circus tent in shape, they are of course much smaller. Straight walled and originally the size of about a large bedroom, they were supported by wood and covered by hides. Decorated as the Mongols do they presented a rather rich and romantic abode, with the additional ability to be broken down and moved easily. This latter feature was essential in order to take advantage of new grazing lands for their animals. Modern yurts are generally made from high technology materials and may be heated with wood stoves, gas or electricity. How closely they resemble their predecessors depends on the builder or manufacturer but the concept stays the same. Yurts are becoming popular options in many of Canada' parks, providing a great alternative to winter camping for those without the skills, stamina or equipment.

Huts

The hut system in Canada is extensive but not well know outside of climbing and ski mountaineering circles. There are huts throughout the Alberta and British Columbia mountain ranges. There are also less isolated systems of huts thoughout Quebec and Ontario. Many of the mountain huts are the work of the Alpine Club of Canada as well as other clubs such as the British Colunbia Mountaineering Club. Some are independant, in the east many are run by the parks bodies. While facilities are usually minimal some huts are really quite appealing in their accomodations and many share one common traite; they are often located in some of Canada's finest backcountry. With few exceptions huts are not accessible by car and some have access which requires expert outdoor skills.

If you want to take advantage of Canada's huts, be prepared to pack in your own gear with the exception of those simple utensils provided at some huts. Many of the access routes require expert skills in either climbing, scrambling, mountaineering or ski mountaineering. In the winter many approaches are through avalanche areas. Avalanche training, knowledge of current conditions and the proper gear are essential. Some huts are only accessible in the summer or may be rarely used due to difficult access in the winter. Consult with the various clubs or authorities regarding use, fees, gear and skill requirements before doing any planning.

Cabins

Cabins vary widely in respect of facilities, access and amenities. Ranging from fully featured, drive-to destinations to remote, rustic sites that offer little more than basic shelter. Be sure to inquire carefully before you book a site to make sure it meets you expectations and you have the skills and equipment required for access.

Note Carefully: Use of huts is at the discretion of the groups who own and maintain them. Many huts are locked with access available through those groups only. Trail or route access is often difficult and may be impossible in some seasons or during incliment weather. Always obtain persmission, pay fees (including park fees where applicable), research access, facilities and check the weather, consult the authorities and leave a trip plan with someone responsible before setting out and never go alone. Winter temperatures can plumit in a few hours to minus thirty or more in many areas of Canada. If you don't have the skills and equipment hire a qualified guide or don't go.

Alberta British Columbia
Manitoba Newfoundland
New Brunswick Northwest Territories
Nova Scotia Nunavut
Ontario Prince Edward Island
Quebec Saskatchewan
Yukon  

 

 

Alberta

Lodges

 

Backcountry Lodges

 

Huts & Cabins

Abbot Pass Hut - Not recommended in the winter Mt. Victoria, Yoho and Banff National Park - Sleeps 24, sleeping pads, propane light, wood stove Rocky Mountains, Mt. Victoria, Yoho and Banff National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Bow Hut - Sleeps 30, Wood stove, sleeping pads, Coleman lanterns, utensils, Rocky Mountains, north east of St. Nicholas Creek, Wapta Ice Field, Banff National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Castle Mountain Hut - Not used in winter Castle Mountain, Banff National Park - Sleeps 6, propane light (user supplied green Coleman canister), some utensils, Rocky Mountains, Castle Mountain, Banff National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Lloyd MacKay (Mt. Alberta) Hut - summer only - Sleeps 6, no heating, white gas cooking stove, foam mattresses, some utensils, Rocky Mountains, Mt. Alberta, Jasper National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Mount Colin Centennial Hut - not used in winter, Colin Range, Jasper National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Neil Colgan Hut - almost exclusively summer use - Sleeps 18, sleeping pads, Coleman stoves, lanterns and some utensils, Rocky Mountains, Valley of Ten Peaks, Banff National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Peter and Catherine Whyte (Peyto) Hut - Sleeps 18, sleeping pads, Coleman stoves, lanterns and some utensils, Rocky Mountains, below Mount Thompson, Wapta Icefields, Banff National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

R.J. Ritchie (Balfour) Hut - Sleeps 18, sleeping pads, Coleman stoves, lanterns and some utensils, Rocky Mountains, Wapta Icefield near the Vulture Glaciers toe, Banff National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Scott Duncan Hut - Sleeps 12, sleeping pads, Coleman stoves, lanterns and some utensils, Rocky Mountains, Wapta Icefields below Mount Daly, Banff National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Sydney Vallance (Fryatt) Hut - Sleeps 12, woodstove, propane cook stoves, propane lighting, utensils, Rocky Mountains, Fryatt Valley, Jasper National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Wates-Gibson Hut - Sleeps 26 summer, 24 winter, woodstove, foam mattresses, propane oven and range, propane lighting, utensils, Canadian Rocky Mountains,
Tonquin Valley, Jasper National Park, Alberta - Alpine Club of Canada Parks Canada

Note: Huts in national parks require backcountry permits from the park as well as park access passes if you park your vehicle. If the hut is run by the Alpine Club of Canada we highly recommend you purchase your backcountry permit through them , as they recieve a percentage of the fee to support thier efforts.

Huts and cabins built and/or maintained by outdoor clubs usually have fees and may require membership. Some shelters are for the exclusive use of club members and are not open to the public. Contact the club for details and requirements.

Canadian Avalanche Association
Avalanche Safety


Out-There - www.out-there.com - Home

British Columbia

Backcountry Lodges

Huts & Cabins

Note: Huts in national parks require backcountry passes from the park as well as park access passes if you park your vehicle. If the hut is run by the Alpine Club of Canada we highly recommend you purchase your backcountry pass through them , as they recieve a percentage of the fee to support thier efforts.

Huts and cabins built and/or maintained by outdoor clubs usually have fees and may require membership. Some shelters are for the exclusive use of club members and are not open to the public. Contact the club for details and requirements.


Out-There - www.out-there.com - Home

Manitoba

Manitoba's Provincial Parks have several cabins located at Camp Morton and Hecla/Grindstone Provincial Park. In addition you'll find yurts at the following parks:

  • Whiteshell Provincial Park
  • Spruce Woods Provincial Park
  • Asessippi Provincial Park
  • Clearwater Lake Provincial Park
  • Bakers Narrows Provincial Park

    Click on the parks link above for more information and remember to book early for these popular sites.


 

Newfoundland & Labrador


 

New Brunswick


 

Northwest Territories


 

Nova Scotia


 

Nunavut


Out-There - www.out-there.com - Home

Ontario

Lodges Ontario

Ontario Parks has been a pioneer in developing the yurt as a all season wilderness shelter. As of this writing the following parks have yurts which are available to the public, Algonquin, Awenda, Balsam Lake, Bon Echo, Bonnechere, Emily, Kilbear, MacGregor Point, Pancake Bay, Pinery, Quetico, Sandbanks, Sturgeaon Bay. This program is proving to be extremely popular so reservations well in advance are usually required.

 

Huts & Cabins

The following is a listing of the restored backcountry ranger cabins in Algonquin Provincial Park. Contact the park for information on availability and features.

  • Big Crow Cabin - Central Section
  • Birchcliffe Cabin - Northern Section
  • Bissett Creek Cabin - Northern Section
  • Crooked Chute Cabin - Eastern Section
  • Highview Cabin - Western Section
  • Kiosk Cabin - Northern Section
  • Kitty Lake Cabin - Southern Section
  • Lost Coin Lake Cabin - Northern Section
  • McKaskill Lake Cabin - Southern Section
  • Rain River Cabin - Western Section
  • Tattler Lake Cabin - Southern Section
  • Wenda Lake Cabin - Eastern Section

    Sleeping Giant, Bon Echo and Bonchere Provincial Parks have rustic cabins which can be rented. Contact Ontario Parks for more information.

    Cottages

  • Awenda
  • Balsam Lake
  • Sandbanks
  • Sturgeon Bay

 

Parks Report Ontario - Campsite Vacancy, Beach Closures, Boil Water Advisories, Fire Bans, Ski Reports, Fall Colour Reports - Great Idea!


 

Prince Edward Island


Out-There - www.out-there.com - Home

Quebec

Huts & Cabins

Quebec Provincial Parks as well as the Wildlife Reserves have a goodly number of huts and cabins available to the public. These range from primitive shelters to beautiful log cabins with all the amenities. Most of the sites are easily accessible.

The following is a list of select parks and what they offer.

Mont Tremblant has cabins for rent in three seperate areas of the park. Lac Chabot has five differnt cabins which sleep from five to seven people each. The Lac Monroe area has two cabins, one that sleeps six and one four. L'Assomption has four cabins. The cabins can accommodate, two, four, eight or ten people.

Jacques Cartier has cabins available in four different areas of the park. Devlin has five cabins, one of which sleeps six people, while all the rest sleep four. The Valee sector has six cabins which all sleep four, except for the Godendart which has a capacity of six. There are three cabins in the Secteur de la Vallee-Balbuzard all of which can accommodate four people. Larger groups will be happy to find the Pavillon Lac a l'Epaule which can accommodate fourteen people comfortably. It is located in the Sectuer a l'Epaule.

This is only a sample of what the parks and reserves offer. Consult with their web sites to get details.

Lodges

Several of Quebec's parks and park tourism sites have resorts and lodges the best known of which is Gte du Mont-Albert located in the Chic-Choc Range of the Gaspesie. The resort has a hotel, lodge and cabins available for backcountry and cross country skiers as well as hikers in the summer. Quebec Provincial Parks

La Mauricie National Park

The remnants of a bygone era, the Webanaki and Andrew lodges originally accommodated wealthy Americans, including Joseph and Rose Kennedy, the parents of the former president of the United States. The lodges can be reached by hiking, mountain biking, canoeing (significant portages are involved) in the summer. In the winter access is by cross country skiing or snow shoeing.

Wabenaki - Sleeps 26 (2 dormitories), kitchen, lounge, fireplace, bathrooms, showers, heat and electricity.

Andrew - Sleeps 16 (4 rooms with 4 beds), lounge, fireplace, bathrooms, showers, heat and electricity.

You must bring your own gear, food, sleeping bag and toiletries. Reservations are required (book early). Contact the park for details.

Yurts

Quebec Provincial Parks now have 28 yurts available for rent.

Pleasance has six yurts available that sleep four. They include electricity and porpane. As of this writing they are only available during the summer and fall.

Mont Tremblant has nine yurts you can choose from. There are four in the L'Assomption sector with propane and wood heating and five in Pembina with electricity and wood heating. inEach sleeps four and has electricity and propane. As of this writing L'Assomption yurts are available in the summer and fall and the Pembina yurts can be reserved all year long.

Jacques Cartier has five yurts which are available year round. Each yurt sleeps four and has electricity, propane and wood heating.

Bic has eight yurts available year round. All of the yurts sleep four, have propane and heat with wood.

None of the yurts have showers. Contact the parks for reservations, fees and regulations.

 


 

Saskatchewan


 

Yukon

 

Out-There - www.out-there.com - Home
 
All contents copyright 1995-2011 White Cat Ventures Ltd.

 
Press here if you have arrived at this page without
the navigation bar on the left