Gros Morne National Park
Address City
P.O. Box 130 Rocky Harbour
Province Country
NF Canada
Postal Code  
A0K 4N0
 
Gros Morne National Park encompasses a spectacular area in northeastern Newfoundland. With deep fjords, the barren lands and the wild Long Range Mountains contrasted by extensive lowlands, rocky shores and broad crescent beaches. The park is known for its world class kayaking and its unique and challenging backpacking and for the number and variety of wildlife which make the area home.
A view across Bonne Bay from one of the many beautiful stony beaches in Gros Morne National Park
 
Location:  Located on the northwest coast of the island of Newfoundland. From the Port aux Basques ferry terminal you take route 1 to Deer Lake then take route 430 to Wiltondale at the entrance to the park.

Climate: The average summer temp. is 15 C. At higher elevations it can be 2 to -4 C. In winter: -6 C in January, -8 C in February and -5 C in March

Mountain Climbing: The park has mountain climbing, contact the park office for more information. .

Mountain Biking: There are a number of fairly wide pea gravel trails in the park that allow mountain biking.

 
Backpacking: Various backcountry campsites provide backpacking opportunities for exploring the diverse features of Gros Morne National Park. Trips range in difficulty from easy overnight hikes, to challenging and physically demanding five-day wilderness treks. Backpadking in the Tablelands and through the Long Range Mountains is some of the most challenging in North America.  
A shallow bay at Green Point
Gros Morne National Park
 
Green Gardens: Expert (Backpack), 16km, loop. The trail has two entrances, the Wallace Brook Trailhead which is along Highway 431, just 11 km from Woody Point (5 km from Trout River) and the Long Pond Trailhead which is 13 km from Woody Point (3 km from Trout River). Both have large parking lots and pit toilets. For the overnight hiker there are primitive campsites at three locations along the coastline. All sites have picnic tables and pit toilets. Campfires are permitted only on the beach so you must bring a backpacking stove. The route is shorter if you start from the Long Pond Trailhead. Permits are required and fees are collected. Trail Map - From Gros Morne National Park

Gros Morne Mountain Trail: Expert, 16km return. The trail takes you to the second highest peak on the Island of Newfoundland, at 806 meters its height is exceeded only by Lewis Hill. A flat-topped mountain, keep your eyes open for rock ptarmigan, arctic hare, and woodland caribou. You'll pass a cluster of small ponds at the base of the mountain where you'll get a great view of Bonne Bay to the south, then the trail follows a steep bouldery gully to the summit of the mountain. This is the most difficult part of the hike and the climb will take at least one hour as the trail gains almost 500 m in elevation. There is a fee for each night out and you must register with park staff. Ferry Gulch backcountry campsite will accommodate 3 tents and is equipped with tent pads, pit toilet, bear pole, and picnic tables. No fires are permitted so you must carry a backpacking stove. Trail Map - From Gros Morne National Park

Long Range Mountains Traverse: Extreme, 62km. This area has some of the best wilderness backpacking in eastern North America. The hikes include the North Rim Traverse at 27 km in length, which takes 3 days or more to complete and the Long Range Traverse at 35 km in length taking 4 days or more to complete. These are map-and-compass traverses and are the ultimate hiking challenges of Gros Morne National Park. Pre-trip orientation is a requirement and is given at the Visitor Centre, contact the park for details. Permits are required and fees are collected. No fires are permitted so you must carry a backpacking stove. The "Trail Guide" is a waterproof topographic map with hiking trail profiles 1:100 000 scale, it's available for a fee from the park office. Trail Map - From Gros Morne National Park

Snug Harbour Trail: Intermediate, 8km one way. This trail is a spur off Western Brook Pond Trail and leads to a campsite at the foot of the Long Range Mountains. You might encounter muddy conditions on this trail at different times of year. The seasonal bridge across Western Brook near the outlet of the pond is usually in place from mid-June to mid-October, water level permitting. Permits are required and fees are collected. No fires are permitted so you must carry a backpacking stove. The "Trail Guide" is a waterproof topographic map with hiking trail profiles 1:100 000, it's available for a fee from the park office.

Stanleyville Trail: Intermediate, 4km. The trail starts at the Lomond Day-use Area and travels through the forest, moving uphill and over a ridge before descending towards Stanleyville cove on the shore of the East Arm. There is primitive camping along the trail. Permits are required and fees are collected. No fires are permitted so you must carry a backpacking stove.The "Trail Guide" is a waterproof topographic map with hiking trail profiles 1:100 000 scale, it's available for a fee from the park office.

Hiking: There are more than 100 km of trails in the park, ranging from half-hour strolls to four or five day backpacking routes. In total there are over 22 separate hikes in the park. The "Trail Guide" is a waterproof topographic map with hiking trail profiles at 1:100 000 scale.

Baker Brook Falls Trail: Easy/Intermediate, 10km return. The trail starts at Berry Hill campground and takes you down a boardwalk running through wetlands to a series of waterfalls, Bakers Brook Overfalls. You'll find the largest falls in the park here. The trail should take about 1 hour to complete.

Berry Head Pond Trail: Easy, 2km, loop. The trail begins about 10 km from the Visitors' Center and circles Berry Head Pond which has the first of two viewing platforms. Further along you'll pass through forest and wetlands. The trail provides you the opportunity to catch a glimps for the areas woodland birds and ducks as well as other species. The trail should take about 1/2 to 1 hour to complete.

Berry Hill Trail: Easy, 2km, loop. The trail begins in the Berry Hill campground and provides views of Gros Morne Mountain and Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse. The trail should take about 1/2 to 1hour to complete.

Broom Point Trail: Easy, 1km return. The trail begins at the Broom Point parking lot and takes you through patches of twisted tuckamore trees and a coastal meadow, overlooking the mouth of Western Brook. From there you'll have a sweeping panorama of beachs, backed by tall sand dunes with the Long Range Escarpment in the distance. The trail should take about 1/2 hour to complete.

Green Gardens Trail: Intermediate/Expert (Hike). The trail starts at either Wallace Brook trailhead along highway 431 or the Long Pond trailhead, 13 km from Woody Point. The Long Pond entrance leads you on the most direct route to the coast. Hiking through the barrens, forests, meadows, cliffs and along the coast. You can access the beach from the trial. The coast provides for interesting areas with diverse geology and clifffaces including the dark basalt cliffs of Green Gardens. The trail should take about 3 to 4 or 6 to 8 hours complete depending where you start. River fording of a shallow river is required if you hike the whole loop. There are primitive campsites on route allowing you make an overnight of it.

Green Point Trail: Easy, 3km one way. The trail begins at Green Point campground and travels up the coast running along the bluffs above the beach. At times the trail tunnels through dwarfed tuckamor forest as you head towards Baker Brook. The trail should take about 1/2 to 1 hour to complete.

Gros Morne Mountain Trail: Expert, 15km, loop. The trail begins 3 km south of the Visitor Centre and is one of the most popular hikes in the park. It climbs to the summit of Gros Morne Mountain which is an ascent of more that 800 meters, with a particulary steep section on route. At the right time of the year you might see some of the herd of Caribou that live in the park. There are also Arctic hare, rock ptarmigan, water pipits and horned larks. This can be a grueling hike but worth the trip. The trail should take about 7 to 8 hours complete. Hikers should ascend the Gully while using Ferry Gulch on the return for safety reasons. The hike shouldn't be attempted in bad weather.

Lobster Cove Head Trail: Easy/Intermediate, 2km. This is a network of trails that start at the Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse and lead to viewpoints overlooking the ocean, while other trails take you to the shoreline where you can see tide pools and underwater life such as sea anemones, mussels, sea urchins, crabs and various ocean fish. The trail should take about 1 hour to complete.

Lomond River Trail: Intermediate, 6km one way. The trail starts in the parking lot beside higway 431 just east of the turnoff to the Lomond Day-use Area and takes you through the forest to the Lomond River. You will travel through a forest pine maple and ash with trees that are very large for this part of the province. The trail should take about 2 hours to complete.

Lookout Trail: Intermediate to Expert, 5km loop. The trail starts on highway 431 about 1 km from Woody Point. It climbs passed the treeline to the summit of Partidgeberry Hill, where you will have a panoramic view of Bonne Bay, Gros Morne, the Long Range mountains, the Lookout Hills Plateau and the Tablelands. The trail should take about 2 1/2 hours to complete.

Old Mail Road Trail: Easy, 2km. The trail begins in the Shallow Bay Day-use Area. As you hike you will pass though forests of dwarfed white spruce and balsam fir and across dunes on a boardwalk to Shallow Bay beach, which has the most extensive sand beach in the park. The trail should take about 1/2 hour to complete.

Snug Harbour Trail: Intermediate, 8km one way. The trail starts after a 2 km walk along Western Brook Pond Trail and travels through a wet mossy forest to a pebble beach. It then goes back into the forest again where it climbs small hills of glacial moraine. The trail leads to the primitive campsite of Snug Harbour. The trail should take about 2 1/2 hours to complete.

Southeast Brook Falls Trail: Easy to Intermediate, 1km. This trail begins in the parking lot about 10.5 km north of Wiltondale on Hwy 430 and takes you to a viewpoint at the top of the Southeast Brook Falls, that overlooks the valley of Southeast Brook. The trail should take about 1/2 hour complete.

Stanleyville Trail: Intermediate, 4km return. This trail starts at the Lomond Day-use area and travels uphill through the forest, then descends toward a small cove on the shore of the East Arm. The trail should take about 2 hours to complete.

Stuckless Pond Trail: Intermediate, 9.5km loop. The trail begins by the parking lot off of Hwy 431 just east of the turnoff to the Lomond Day-use Area. It travels along a boardwalk, over a fen then passes through dense mixed forest where you will cross a suspension bridge over the Lomond River before ascending to Stuckless Pond. The trail should take about 3 to 4 hours to complete.

Tablelands Trail: Intermediate, 4km return. The trail starts about 4 km from Woody Point and leads you to the tablelands, which are one of the reasons that Gros Morne was named Canada's 10th World Heritage Site. You travel across the rock barrens of the Tablelands which are made of peridotite rock, which is rare at the earth's surface. The trail should take about 1 1/2 hours to complete.

Trout River Pond Trail: Intermediate, 14km return. The trail starts at the Trout River Day-use area and follows the north shore of Trout River Pond. Traveling at first through meadows and forest, it then heads out across the rock barrens of the Tablelands. You will encounter many intermittent stream crossings as you climb above the Narrows, where two ponds join along a beach. At the end of the trail you will have a view of the Big Pond in the valley below. The trail should take about 4 to 5 hours to complete.

Western Brook Pond Trail: Easy to Intermediate, 3 km or 4.5 km one way. This trail starts 32 km north of the Visitors Centre on Hwy 430. It leads to the Western Brook Pond, where you will see wetlands separated by low forested limestone ridges. This is a very good trail for spotting waterfowl. From here you can continue to Stag Brook, which starts about 100 meters from the edge of the pond. This trail gives you a view of the Long Range Mountains and takes you to a secluded sandy beach. The trail should take about 1/2 to 1 1/2 hours to complete.

 
Backcountry and Cross Country Skiing: 30 km of groomed trails. There is back country skiing as well. There are 2 backcountry ski huts that can accommodate a maximum of 12 people at a cost of $20 per person a night. For information contactl the Visitor Centre.

Snowshoeing: The park has dedicated snowshoeing trails.

Looking back up the stony beach at the wind swept tuckamore trees at Green Pointe campground in Gros Morne National Park
 

Front Country Camping

Reservations can be made through the parks website via Parks Canada Camping

Berry Hill Campground: 152 sites. Located in a wooded area just passed the visitors center off of the 430. The campground has showers, flush toilets, kitchen shelters and a trailer dumping station.

Shallow Bay: 50 sites in a mix of wooded and open areas. The campground has showers, flush toilets, kitchen shelters and a dumping station. Located in the north of the park just off the 430 the campground is just up from a sandy beach which allows swimming.

Green Point: 18 sites in tuckamore stands, just up from a pebble beach over looking the ocean. Kitchen shelter and vault toilets. Located north of the visitors center along the 430.

Lomond: 29 sites in an open area with great views. The campground has showers, flush toilets and a dumping station. Locate off the 431 which branches off the 430 at Wiltondale the campground is just below the Tablelands.

Trout River: 29 sites in an open area with great views across the fjords. The campground has flush toilets, showers and kitchen shelter as well as beach with swimming.

Backcountry Camping: The park has a number of wilderness sites along its backpacking trails. Backpacking stoves must be carried since fires are not permitted except at Green Gardens on the beach. There is a nightly fee for use of the sites and registration before you set out is mandatory.

Winter Camping: There is winter camping at Green Point Campground with an enclosed kitchen shelter and a wood stove and vault toilets. There are also 2 backcountry ski huts that can accommodate up to 12 people at $20 per person a night.

Canoeing: There is lake and ocean canoeing in the park.

Kayaking: Four of the campgrounds (Shallow Bay, Green Point, Lomond, and Trout River) provide direct access to water and all have suitable areas for launching and landing a kayak. There are also several backcountry campsites with access to the water. There are 7 excellent places to sea kayak in Gross Morne -Trout River Ponds: Trout River to Bonne Bay: Outer Bonne Bay: Inner Bonne Bay: Rocky Harbour to Cow Head: St. Pauls Inlet: and Western Brook Pond. Gros Morne has guides and outfitters.

Literature:

Books: Rocks Adrift, a beautiful photographic guide to the park's geological features.

Maps: Gros Morne Trail Guide has a description of all of the parks trails including elevation profiles along with a topographical map of the park in 1:100,000 scale which is available from the visitors center for a fee.

 
Note: Dogs are allowed in the park but are not allowed to roam loose. For their own safety and for that of park wildlife, pets must be on a leash or otherwise physically restrained at all times. Newfoundland and Labrador Wildlife Division regulations prohibit dogs from any place frequented by wildlife at any time from April 1st to August 31st. This includes Gros Morne Mountain.
 
Gros Morne is made up of two distinctly different landscapes; a coastal lowland bordering the Gulf of St. Lawrence and an alpine plateau of the Long Range Mountains. These habitats allow for an incredible array of mammals and bird species. There are 20 species of land mammals, including a herd of caribou, along with over 230 species of birds, 11 species of fishes, 2 species of amphibians (introduced), 417 species of bryophytes, and 711 species of vascular plants - trees, flowers, and ferns, within the park.

Towns and Villages Nearby
Deer Lake

Nearest Major Center: Corner Brook

Accomodations and Restaurants
Deer Lake Motel - Deer Lake
Bayside Cottages - Rocky Harbour, Gros Morne
By the Brook - B&B, Cornerbrook
Holiday Inn - Hotel, Cornerbrook

Marble Mountain
Gros Morne Adventures

UNESCO World Heritage

Weather

Official Site:
Parks Canada
The Viking Trail Tourism
Western Newfoundland Tourism
Newfoundland Tourism

 
 
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